Getting Your New Kitten Used To Her New Home

Bringing a new kitten into your home can give joy and laughter to your entire family. A cuddly, curious kitten can be very exciting, but you need to handle her right so she gets used to the new environment. Read on to learn the special care your new furry friend may need in during the first days at home so as to quickly adapt to her new surroundings,

Bringing the kitten home safely

Kittens are often panicky when they are first separated from their mom and littermates, so you need to take the time to make them feel comfortable by being gentle and carrying them in a well-ventilated container that makes them feel secure.

For instance, use a carrier that has been lined with soft, clean towels to give the kitten a warm, cozy resting place and help absorb any accidents the kitten might have if they are excessively fussy on the way home.

It also helps to ensure that a new kitten gets tested for diseases before bringing them home, for their safety and the safety of other pets you may have in the house. Ensure that your new kitten gets tested for diseases such feline leukemia and vaccinated against parasites before joining the rest of your feline family. 

Introducing the kitten to the your home

Once you get the new kitten home, place her carrier in a quiet space and let her stay in there until she’s ready to come out. Even when she ventures out, be sure to leave the carrier open, as it provides a familiar hiding spot where she can retreat to whenever she feels threatened.

Before introducing the new kitten to your family, it is important that you give her time to adapt to the new environment. You can do this by keeping her in an isolated room or space for a few days to give her time to relax and get confident in her new home.

Offering hiding spots such as empty cardboard boxes can give the kitten a safe place to retreat to when sleeping or feeling anxious. You should also remember to provide food, water and a litter box that you will clean daily to help her adapt to a regular routine of feeding and using the litter box in a safe space.

Once the kitten gets comfortable in her new room, you can then let them venture into other rooms, but be sure to leave her familiar items such as food and litter box in the same spot so she has little trouble finding them. For additional information about taking care of your cat, contact an veterinarian or animal hospital in your area.

How To Care For A Bearded Dragon

Bearded dragons are fairly easy to care for and make great companions, which is why they are great to keep as pets. If you’ve already adopted your bearded dragon, be sure you make an appointment with your local veterinarian (that accepts reptiles) to have your dragon looked over and tested for parasites. See below for other helpful tips to care for your new bearded dragon.

Get The Right Enclosure

Your bearded dragon needs a pretty good size enclosure, as these reptiles can get pretty long and like to climb. A glass enclosure with a screen for a lid (think fish tank) is fine, but it needs to be at least a 10 gallon tank. An enclosure with wooden sides and a glass front is also fine, but you need to be sure the interior is easy to clean and disinfect. Check with your local pet store to find the right type of enclosure for your bearded dragon if you aren’t sure.

Furnish The Interior

The interior of your dragon’s enclosure should have items that are suitable for a reptile. The bedding should be something like reptile carpet, paper towels or newspaper. Add branches so your dragon can climb and add other objects so your dragon can hide. You can use items laying around your house, such as cardboard boxes or an empty paper towel roll. Be sure whatever you use, it hasn’t been treated with pesticides, as these can be harmful to your pet.

Provide Heat

Your dragon likes warmer temperatures, so be sure to add a heat lamp to help control the temperature in your dragon’s enclosure. In the evenings, when temperatures can be a little cooler, use a heating pad beneath the enclosure to warm your dragon. Be sure to have a smoke detector nearby, just in case. 

Give The Proper Food

Bearded dragons should not eat any large food items, as it can cause them to choke or cause an obstruction. Provide young dragons with smaller insects such as crickets and older dragons with insects as well as greens. You can find crickets and other insects at your local pet store.

Greens such as dandelion greens, collards and turnip greens can be fed to your dragon, while other greens such as kale and cabbage should be used to feed them sparingly. You can also give green beans, green peppers, squash and pumpkin to your dragon. Be sure to shred these veggies to ensure your dragon will not choke. Give your dragon a small bowl of water and change it daily.

Bathe Your Dragon

Give your dragon a bath each week to help keep your dragon hydrated and to help your dragon shed. The water should be warm and only about an inch deep. Your dragon may end up using the tub as it’s own personal bathroom, so be sure to disinfect the tub when your dragon is finished bathing. 

These reptiles are easy to care for; just be sure to keep them fed, warm and bathed, and they can live long, happy lives. For more information on lizards for sale, click here.

Taking Care Of Your Cat’s Dental Health: What You Should Know

When you adopt or buy your first cat, your first thoughts are most likely about whether or not you and your cat will get along, as well as about typical cat behaviors like scratching up the furniture. Within the realm of feline health care, on the other hand, you may not know what to expect. Many first-time and even veteran cat owners do not realize just how important their cat’s dental health is or how to take proper care of their teeth. Get to know some of the important facts about taking care of your cat’s dental health so that you can get them to the cat dentist if and when they need it.

Brushing Your Cat’s Teeth Is Important

Just like you need to brush your teeth every day to prevent infection and other oral health problems, your cat needs regular and frequent tooth brushing as well. Ideally, you would want to brush your cat’s teeth every day.

However, if you and your cat are still in the early stages of your relationship, you may need to work up to that level of trust. Many cats do not like being restrained and do not like people messing with their mouths. Start of small by getting your cat comfortable with you holding their head or jaw in your hands. Scratching their chin is a good way to begin this process, as cats tend to like that.

Next, try to expose their teeth by gently pushing back the skin around their mouths. Once they are comfortable with that, you can try to introduce the toothbrush and begin brushing their teeth. Some cats are going to still be adverse to this process and you may need to brush their teeth less frequently and use dental toys, treats, or foods to supplement the tooth brushing process.

Have Their Teeth Cleaned And Examined Regularly

On your cat’s yearly trip to the veterinarian for a routine checkup, have your vet also do a thorough exam of your cat’s mouth and teeth. This routine exam will help to look for signs of plaque or tartar buildup as well as signs of periodontal disease (gum disease) or tooth decay.

If your cat’s teeth seem to have problems, you will want to schedule a teeth cleaning appointment with a cat dentist or with your veterinarian. A professional teeth cleaning for a cat often involves being put under anesthesia to make it easier for your cat’s care provider to remove buildup from the teeth, remove any infected teeth or gum tissue, and thoroughly clean their mouth.

Now that you know more about taking care of your cat’s dental health, you can be sure that you are doing everything you can to make sure your cat is as healthy and happy as possible in your home.  

Telling Your Child About The Death Of A Pet: An Age-Based Guide

Children of varying ages have different ideas about death. While the concept of death is difficult for many toddlers and young children to comprehend, older children tend to understand quite well. As you can imagine, the more a child understands, the more they will react and grieve over the news. Children who don’t understand can also become very confused when too much information is given. For these reasons, you need to tell your child that their pet has died in a way that’s appropriate for their age. Following are a few age-based tips that will help you tell your child about the loss of their pet.  

Ages Two and Three

It is very difficult for children in this age group to understand death. In most cases, they think their pet is merely asleep and will wake up later. As their parent, you need to help your child understand as best you can, but you don’t want to give them too much information. Tell them that their pet has died and will not return. Toddlers tend to bounce back from such news rather quickly. You can expect bouts of sadness along with stretches of time where they seem to have forgotten about it. 

Ages Four, Five and Six

Children in this age group understand death a little bit more. However, they often view it as a change in existence rather than the end of it. For example, if you bury the pet, they may imagine that the pet is still able to eat and play underground. Young children may also begin to fear death at this age. Therefore, it’s very important that you explain why the pet died and reassure them that they are not going to die.

Ages Seven, Eight and Nine

Children in this age range are very curious about death, so you should expect to answer a lot of questions after you break the news. Always reply to such questions with honest answers. Don’t answer vaguely, as it could make their grieving worse. For example, if you tell your child that their pet was put to sleep, they may begin to fear sleep. It’s important in this age range to explain the mechanics of death, but don’t give them more information than they ask for.

Children ages 10 and over usually understand and deal with death much like adults do. However, the emotions they experience after the death of their pet are often new to them, so they may not know how to deal with them very well. With older kids, it’s a good idea to reassure them and let them grieve in the way that seems to work best for them. For further assistance, contact local professionals, such as those from Spring Hill Veterinary Clinic.

Does Your Dog Need A Flu Shot? What You Need To Know Before Going To The Vet

You probably consider whether or not to get a flu shot for yourself and your family members every year, but what about your dog? Canine influenza affects dogs similarly to the ways other flus affect humans. Your vet may offer your dog a flu vaccine to help prevent against this type of infection. Here are a few things you need to know.

The Dog Flu Is Contagious

The dog flu is highly contagious. If you take your dog to the dog park or other social activities with other animals, you may want to consider having your dog vaccinated. While the vaccine doesn’t prevent all strains of dog flu, it can offer an added layer of protection for your pooch. It’s important to remember that the dog flu can’t be spread to humans, so you don’t need to have your dog vaccinated to protect yourself. If your dog has a cough or shows other symptoms of being sick, you should keep it away from other dogs to prevent the spread of the disease. Because this is a relatively new disease in dogs, nearly all dogs are susceptible to contracting the infection. Having your dog vaccinated can help prevent the spread of disease to your pet and to others in your neighborhood.

The Dog Flu Is Not Typically Dangerous

For healthy dogs, the having flu can be a miserable experience, but it is not often deadly. Dogs with previous respiratory issues or dogs with weakened immune systems may have a more difficult time recovering from the dog flu. Pneumonia is a complication that sometimes arises with dog flu, and in rare cases, death can occur. It’s a good idea to talk about your dog’s overall health and whether or not the pet is a good candidate for the flu vaccine.

The Dog Flu Is Not Seasonal

While humans typically tend to catch the flu in the fall or winter months, the dog flu can strike at any time during the year. It’s important to take precautions to protect your dog year-round. This means keeping pet toys, especially those that go to the dog park with your pet, clean. Be sure to wash your hands before feeding and watering your pets, and keep pet beds and kennels clean as well.

Vaccines On The Market

There are currently two types of known dog flu strands; the H3N8 and H3N2. There are two vaccines available for H3N8, and one vaccine has been granted conditional approval for preventing H3N2. This new vaccine has not been approved for use in every state, so check with your vet clinic about its availability for your dog.

Caring for your pet means trying to keep it as healthy as possible all year round. Understanding the different illnesses that can affect your dog and how to prevent them will make it easier for you to give your furry friend the gifts of good health and happiness. Contact a local vet, like Pet Medical Center – Full Service Veterinary Care, for more information.